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Gone but not forgotten: Notable sports figures who died in 2021 – The Boston Globe

Written by corres2

Jan. 1 at age 78. Pro Football Hall of Fame running back who starred at Syracuse before becoming a franchise cornerstone in the Denver Broncos’ early days.

Paul Westphal

Jan. 2 at age 70. Basketball Hall of Famer who played on the Celtics’ 1974 champions and coached the Phoenix Suns to the NBA Finals in 1993.

After a 12-year playing career, Paul Westphal was a head coach in the NBA for 10 more years.Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press

John Muckler

Jan. 4 at age 86. Head coach of the Oilers’ Stanley Cup champions in 1990 and an assistant with four other Edmonton Cup winners.

Colin Bell

Jan. 5 at age 74. English soccer great who scored 152 goals in 492 games for Manchester City.

Tommy Lasorda

Jan. 7 at age 93. Hall of Fame manager who led the Dodgers to World Series titles in 1981 and 1988 in a 20-year career at their helm.

Tommy Lasorda was never shy about expressing his opinions to umpires.
Tommy Lasorda was never shy about expressing his opinions to umpires.Charles Krupa/Associated Press

Dee Rowe

Jan. 10 at age 91. University of Connecticut basketball coach (1969-77) and renowned ambassador and fund-raiser for the school.

Jon Arnett

Jan. 16 at age 85. Star running back for Southern Cal in the 1950s and five-time Pro Bowler for the Los Angeles Rams.

Don Sutton

Jan. 18 at age 75. Hall of Fame pitcher who compiled 324 victories, is third all time in games started, and had a 23-year career with five teams, mostly the Dodgers.

Don Sutton works against the Yankees in the 1978 World Series.
Don Sutton works against the Yankees in the 1978 World Series.UNCREDITED/Associated Press

Harthorne Wingo

Jan. 20 at age 73. Reserve forward and fan favorite on the Knicks’ 1973 NBA champions.

Ted Thompson

Jan. 20 at age 68. General manager of the 2010 Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers.

Hank Aaron

Jan. 22 at age 86. A baseball giant and civil rights force who overcame racial intimidation to break Babe Ruth’s iconic home run mark in 1974 and set an array of other records in a magnificent Hall of Fame career.

The great Hank Aaron is shown at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn in 1954, when he was just embarking on one of the finest careers in major league history.
The great Hank Aaron is shown at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn in 1954, when he was just embarking on one of the finest careers in major league history.Associated Press

George Armstrong

Jan. 24 at age 90. Hockey Hall of Famer who captained the Toronto Maple Leafs to four Stanley Cup championships in the 1960s.

Ron Johnson

Jan. 26 at age 64. Former Red Sox first base coach and Pawtucket manager.

Sekou Smith

Jan. 26 at age 48. Basketball reporter and analyst for Turner Sports.

John Chaney

Jan. 29 at age 89. Legendary men’s basketball coach at Temple who led the Owls to 17 NCAA Tournament appearances over 24 seasons.

John Chaney compiled a 516–253 record at Temple.
John Chaney compiled a 516–253 record at Temple.TOM MIHALEK/Associated Press

Grant Jackson

Feb. 2 at age 78. Winning pitcher for the Pirates in Game 7 of the 1979 World Series, part of an 18-year career with six teams.

Tony Trabert

Feb. 3 at age 90. Tennis Hall of Famer who won five Grand Slam singles titles — including three of the four in 1955 — and became a popular broadcaster for the sport.

Tony Trabert makes a backhand return at Wimbledon in 1955, his finest season.
Tony Trabert makes a backhand return at Wimbledon in 1955, his finest season.Associated Press

Dianne Dunham

Feb. 4 at age 52. First Black woman to win a USA Gymnastics national championship (all-around, 1983).

Leon Spinks

Feb. 5 at age 67. Unlikely victor over Muhammad Ali in a heavyweight title bout in 1978.

In only his eighth professional fight, Leon Spinks (right) won a split decision over Muhammad Ali, one of the greatest upsets in boxing history.
In only his eighth professional fight, Leon Spinks (right) won a split decision over Muhammad Ali, one of the greatest upsets in boxing history.Associated Press

Charlie Krueger

Feb. 6 at age 84. All-Pro defensive tackle who spent his entire 16-year career with the San Francisco 49ers.

Ralph Backstrom

Feb. 7 at age 83. Center who won the Calder Trophy as NHL Rookie of the Year in 1959 and played on six Stanley Cup winners with the Montreal Canadiens.

Pedro Gomez

Feb. 7 at age 58. ESPN baseball correspondent.

Pedro Gomez in 2018 with his son, Rio Gomez, a pitcher in the Red Sox organization.
Pedro Gomez in 2018 with his son, Rio Gomez, a pitcher in the Red Sox organization. Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff

Marty Schottenheimer

Feb. 8 at age 77. Boston Patriots linebacker who went on to become the eighth-winningest coach in NFL history, with 200 victories for the Browns, Chiefs, Redskins, and Chargers.

Marty Schottenheimer in 1996, when he was coach of the Kansas City Chiefs.
Marty Schottenheimer in 1996, when he was coach of the Kansas City Chiefs.BARRY SWEET/Associated Press

Billy Conigliaro

Feb. 10 at age 73. Younger brother of Tony Conigliaro who played outfield for three years for the Red Sox after being their first-ever draft pick in 1965 and finished his career with the 1973 World Series champion A’s.

Billy Conigliaro (right) with his brother Tony in 1969, when they were Red Sox teammates.
Billy Conigliaro (right) with his brother Tony in 1969, when they were Red Sox teammates.Frank Curtin/Associated Press

Vincent Jackson

Feb. 15 at age 38. Three-time Pro Bowl receiver who played 12 years in the NFL with the Chargers and Buccaneers.

Lew Krausse

Feb. 16 at age 77. Pitcher who started the first game in Milwaukee Brewers history (1970) and later played one season (1972) for the Red Sox.

Angel Mangual

Feb. 16 at age 73. Outfielder on all three Oakland A’s champion teams of the 1970s (1972-74).

Juan Pizarro

Feb. 18 at age 84. Hard-throwing lefthander who pitched in two World Series with the Milwaukee Braves (1957-58) but had his most success with the White Sox in an 18-year career.

LaVannes Squires

Feb. 19 at age 90. Guard on Kansas’s 1952 NCAA basketball champions and the first Black player in school history.

Stan Williams

Feb. 20 at age 84. Intimidating righthander on the 1959 World Series champion Dodgers who played for six teams and was pitching coach for the AL champion Red Sox in 1975.

Doug Wilkerson

Feb. 22 at age 73. Pro Bowl guard who played 14 seasons for the San Diego Chargers.

Louis Nix

Feb. 27 at age 29. Standout Notre Dame nose guard.

Irv Cross

Feb. 28 at age 81. Pro Bowl defensive back who in 1971 became the first full-time Black sports analyst on television and was a popular figure on CBS’s “The NFL Today.”

Irv Cross was a familiar face to CBS viewers in the 1970s.
Irv Cross was a familiar face to CBS viewers in the 1970s.ANN HEISENFELT/Associated Press

Joe Altobelli

March 3 at age 88. Manager of the 1983 World Series champion Baltimore Orioles.

Mark Pavelich

March 4 at age 63. Gritty forward on the US Olympic hockey “Miracle on Ice” team that won gold at Lake Placid in 1980.

Rheal Cormier

March 8 at age 53. Pitcher who went 71-64 with five teams in a 16-year career, including three with the Red Sox (1995, 1999-2000).

Norm Sherry

March 8 at age 89. Dodgers catcher (1959-62) and Angels manager (1976-77) whose advice to Sandy Koufax at spring training in 1961 is credited with helping the Hall of Famer reach his potential.

Marvelous Marvin Hagler

March 13 at age 66. Punishing Brockton middleweight who dominated the division in the 1980s, going 62-3-2 (52 knockouts) and holding the title for seven years.

Marvin Hagler's signature bout was a brutal slugfest he won against Thomas Hearns (left) in 1985.
Marvin Hagler’s signature bout was a brutal slugfest he won against Thomas Hearns (left) in 1985.Associated Press

Dick Hoyt

March 17 at age 80. Inspirational Boston Marathon fixture for decades who ran while pushing his quadriplegic son Rick in a wheelchair for the 26.2 miles.

Dick and Rick Hoyt were an indefatigable tandem in their annual Boston Marathon appearances.
Dick and Rick Hoyt were an indefatigable tandem in their annual Boston Marathon appearances.Jim Davis/Globe Staff/file

Ed Armbrister

March 17 at age 72. Reds outfielder whose bunt in Game 3 of the 1975 World Series became the center of controversy when it helped set up the winning run over the strenuous objections of the Red Sox for an interference call.

Elgin Baylor

March 22 at age 86. Lakers Hall of Famer who helped transform the NBA into a high-flying game in the 1960s with his athleticism, flair, and sheer talent.

The spectacular athleticism of Elgin Baylor (right) changed the way the NBA game was played.
The spectacular athleticism of Elgin Baylor (right) changed the way the NBA game was played.Danny Goshtigian/Globe Staff/Fil

Granville Waiters

March 23 at age 60. Center for the Pacers, Rockets, and Bulls in a five-year NBA career (1983-88).

Bob Plager

March 24 at age 78. An original St. Louis Blue and one of three brothers who played on their defense in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Bobby Brown

March 25 at age 96. Infielder on five Yankees World Series winners who later became a cardiologist and president of the American League.

Stan Albeck

March 25 at age 89. Head coach of the Spurs, Cavaliers, Nets, and Bulls, and a longtime assistant with several other NBA and ABA teams.

Joe Cunningham

March 25 at age 89. Cardinals outfielder/first baseman who in his first two major league games in 1954 hit three home runs and knocked in nine runs.

Mike Bell

March 26 at age 46. Minnesota Twins bench coach who was the brother (David), son (Buddy), and grandson (Gus) of major leaguers.

Howard Schnellenberger

March 27 at age 87. Football coach who led Miami to its first NCAA championship in 1983 and was offensive coordinator for the 17-0 Miami Dolphins in 1972.

Bobby Schmautz

March 28 at age 76. Popular right winger who had five straight 20-plus-goal seasons for the Bruins from 1975-79.

Bruins winger Bobby Schmautz (right) tangles with Larry Robinson of the archrival Canadiens during a playoff game in 1979.
Bruins winger Bobby Schmautz (right) tangles with Larry Robinson of the archrival Canadiens during a playoff game in 1979.

Tom Landers/Globe Staff

Chuck Schilling

March 30 at age 83. Slick-fielding Red Sox second baseman (1961-65) who was voted the team’s MVP in his rookie season.

Conn Findlay

April 8 at age 90. Olympic gold medalist in rowing in 1956 and 1964 and bronze medalist in sailing in 1976.

Red Gendron

April 9 at age 63. University of Maine men’s hockey coach from 2013-21.

Slick Leonard

April 13 at age 88. Hall of Fame coach who led the Indiana Pacers to three ABA championships and a two-time All-American who played on Indiana’s 1953 NCAA champions.

Leroy Keyes

April 15 at age 74. College Football Hall of Famer who set several rushing records at Purdue and is considered one of the program’s greatest players.

Johnny Peirson

April 16 at age 95. Right winger who had four 20-goal seasons for the Bruins in the 1940s and ’50s and later became a popular TV analyst during the team’s glory days of the 1970s.

John Peirson (left) and Fred Cusick helped bring Bruins hockey into New England households for many years on Channel 38.
John Peirson (left) and Fred Cusick helped bring Bruins hockey into New England households for many years on Channel 38.Courtesy Andy Emslie

Fred Arbanas

April 17 at age 82. Standout tight end on the Dallas Texans’ 1962 AFL champions and the first two Kansas City Chiefs Super Bowl teams.

Terrence Clarke

April 22 at age 19. Promising basketball prospect from Boston who played a year at Kentucky and was expected to be taken in the NBA Draft until he was killed in a car accident.

Mike Davis

April 25 at age 65. Raiders defensive back whose interception with less than a minute left clinched a 1980 playoff victory over Cleveland and helped propel Oakland to a Super Bowl title.

Ben Dreith

April 25 at age 96. AFL and NFL referee who worked two Super Bowls and is remembered in New England for a controversial roughing-the-passer call in a 1976 playoff game the Patriots lost to the Raiders.

John Konrads

April 26 at age 78. Australian swimmer who set 26 freestyle records in the 1950s and ’60s, and won an Olympic gold medal in 1960.

Tamara Press

April 26 at age 83. Three-time Olympic gold medalist (1960, 1964) in the shot put and discus for the Soviet Union who withdrew from competition amid speculation about her gender.

Pete Lammons

April 29 at age 77. Tight end on the New York Jets Super Bowl champions of 1969.

Bobby Unser

May 2 at age 87. Three-time winner of the Indianapolis 500 and part of the most famous family in auto racing.

Bobby Unser acknowledged the crowd at the 1971 Indianapolis 500.
Bobby Unser acknowledged the crowd at the 1971 Indianapolis 500.CR/Associated Press

Ray Miller

May 4 at age 76. Manager of the Twins and Orioles, and pitching coach for three Cy Young Award winners.

Del Crandall

May 5 at age 91. All-Star catcher on the Milwaukee Braves’ 1957 World Series champions who later managed in the majors and was the last surviving member of the Boston Braves.

Richie Scheinblum

May 10 at age 78. Journeyman outfielder who made the AL All-Star team with the Royals in 1972.

Colt Brennan

May 11 at age 37. Star quarterback for the University of Hawaii who finished third in the 2007 Heisman Trophy voting.

Jerry Burns

May 12 at age 94. Minnesota Vikings head coach for six seasons (1986-91) and defensive backs coach for two Green Bay Packers Super Bowl champions in the 1960s.

Rennie Stennett

May 18 at age 72. Pirates second baseman who in 1975 became the first player in the modern era to go 7 for 7 in a nine-inning game.

Lee Evans

May 19 at age 74. Gold medalist in the 400 meters and 4×400 relay in the 1968 Olympics who wore a black beret as a civil rights protest.

Lee Evans (center) on the medal podium after winning the Olympic 400 meters in Mexico City.
Lee Evans (center) on the medal podium after winning the Olympic 400 meters in Mexico City. Associated Press

Gilles Lupien

May 18 at age 67. Towering Canadiens defenseman sometimes known as Guy Lafleur’s bodyguard.

Joe Beckwith

May 22 at age 66. Reliever on the Royals’ 1985 World Series champions who started his career with the Dodgers.

Ron Hill

May 23 at age 82. British runner who broke the Boston Marathon record by more than 3 minutes when he won in 1970 and became renowned as a “streak runner,” covering at least a mile every day for more than 52 years.

J.D. Roberts

May 24 at age 88. New Orleans Saints head coach (1970-72).

Mark Eaton

May 28 at age 64. Shot-blocking giant for the Utah Jazz who stood 7 feet 4 inches and twice was the NBA’s Defensive Player of the Year.

Mike Marshall

May 31 at age 78. Durable righthander who in 1974 pitched in a major league-record 106 games for the Dodgers and became the first reliever to win the Cy Young Award.

Jim Fassel

June 7 at age 71. Coach who led the New York Giants to Super Bowl XXXV in January 2001 and was NFL Coach of the Year in 1997.

Jim ‘Mudcat’ Grant

June 11 at age 85. The first Black pitcher to win 20 games in the American League and a key part of the Minnesota Twins’ AL champion team in 1965.

Don Byron

June 12 at age 68. Member of the Massachusetts Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame who led boys’ teams at Oliver Ames, Mansfield, Walpole, and Abington.

John Marinatto

June 12 at age 64. Big East commissioner during a tumultuous period of conference realignment across college sports.

Jim Phelan

June 15 at age 92. Basketball coach who led Mount St. Mary’s to five NCAA Division 2 Final Fours and the 1962 national championship in a 49-year career.

Milkha Singh

June 18 at age 91. Acclaimed Indian sprinter known as “The Flying Sikh.”

Tom Kurvers

June 21 at age 58. Defenseman who played 11 years in the NHL for seven teams after winning the Hobey Baker Award at Minnesota Duluth in 1984.

Rene Robert

June 22 at age 72. Right winger on the Buffalo Sabres’ dynamic “French Connection” line in the 1970s along with center Gil Perreault and left winger Rick Martin.

Rene Robert had two 40-goal seasons for the Sabres and hit the 100-point mark in 1975.
Rene Robert had two 40-goal seasons for the Sabres and hit the 100-point mark in 1975.Associated Press

Jack Ingram

June 25 at age 84. NASCAR Hall of Famer who won five championships and more than 300 races on the circuit’s second-tier series (now known as Xfinity).

Tom Reich

July 2 at age 82. Pioneering baseball agent who helped enrich players in the early years of free agency.

Terry Donahue

July 4 at age 77. Winningest football coach in UCLA history (151-74-8) and the first man to appear in the Rose Bowl as a player, assistant coach, and head coach.

Bryan Watson

July 8 at age 78. Feisty defenseman who played for six teams (mostly Detroit and Pittsburgh) from 1963-79 and was the coach of the Edmonton Oilers in their inaugural NHL season.

Dick Tidrow

July 10 at age 74. Righthander who racked up 100 major league wins in 13 years with five teams, mostly the Cubs and Yankees.

John Rotz

July 12 at age 86. Hall of Fame jockey who won the 1962 Preakness (on Greek Money) and 1970 Belmont (on High Echelon).

Ryan Kilian

July 12 at age 43. Boys’ basketball coach at Bedford High School.

Shirley Fry

July 13 at age 94. Tennis Hall of Famer who completed a career Grand Slam by winning all four major titles in the 1950s.

Dennis Murphy

July 15 at age 94. Entrepreneur who helped found the ABA, WHA, and World Team Tennis.

Gloria Ratti

July 24 at age 90. A champion of women’s running who helped modernize the Boston Marathon and rose to BAA vice president.

Jocelyne Bourassa

Aug. 3 at age 74. Star Canadian golfer and the LPGA Rookie of the Year in 1972.

J.R. Richard

Aug. 4 at age 81. Hard-throwing righthander who pitched 10 seasons for the Houston Astros before his career was cut short by a stroke in 1980.

Bo Scott

Aug. 4 at age 78. Cleveland Browns running back for six seasons (1969-74).

Bobby Bowden

Aug. 8 at age 91. College Football Hall of Fame coach who made Florida State a national powerhouse, winning national championships in 1993 and 1999.

Bobby Bowden had 377 wins, second-most in major college history, and led Florida State to 33 consecutive winning seasons.
Bobby Bowden had 377 wins, second-most in major college history, and led Florida State to 33 consecutive winning seasons.PHIL COALE/Associated Press

Tony Esposito

Aug. 10 at age 78. Hall of Fame Black Hawks goaltender who won the Calder Trophy as Rookie of the Year in 1970 (15 shutouts), won three Vezina Trophies, and was the brother of Bruins legend Phil Esposito.

Tony Esposito guards the Chicago net, with his brother Phil Esposito lurking in the slot.
Tony Esposito guards the Chicago net, with his brother Phil Esposito lurking in the slot.Getty Images/Getty

Roger Harring

Aug. 12 at age 88. College Football Hall of Fame coach who led Wisconsin La Crosse to two Division 3 titles and piled up 261 career victories.

Joe Walton

Aug. 15 at age 85. Coach who went 53-57-1 in seven years with the New York Jets, leading them to the playoffs twice.

Dick Schafrath

Aug. 15 at age 84. All-Pro offensive tackle who played 13 seasons for the Cleveland Browns (1959-71).

Bill Freehan

Aug. 19 at age 79. Rock-solid catcher who made 11 All-Star teams and won five Gold Gloves in a 15-year career with the Detroit Tigers that included a World Series title in 1968.

Bill Freehan holds his ground and tags out the Cardinals' Lou Brock at home in Game 5 of the 1968 World Series.
Bill Freehan holds his ground and tags out the Cardinals’ Lou Brock at home in Game 5 of the 1968 World Series.Anonymous/Associated Press

Rod Gilbert

Aug. 22 at age 80. Hockey Hall of Fame right wing who spent his entire 16-year career with the New York Rangers and remains their career leader in goals (406) and points (1,021).

Jimmy Hayes

Aug. 23 at age 31. Dorchester native who won an NCAA hockey championship at Boston College and played two of his seven NHL seasons with the Bruins (2015-17).

Jimmy Hayes scores against Pittsburgh's Marc-Andre Fleury in a 2016 game at TD Garden.
Jimmy Hayes scores against Pittsburgh’s Marc-Andre Fleury in a 2016 game at TD Garden.USA Today Sports

Jacques Rogge

Aug. 29 at age 79. President of the International Olympic Committee from 2001-13.

Keith McCants

Sept. 2 at age 53. All-America linebacker at Alabama who was drafted fourth overall by Tampa Bay in 1990 but played just six years in the NFL.

David Patten

Sept. 2 at age 47. Receiver on three Patriots Super Bowl winners who caught Tom Brady’s first postseason touchdown pass.

David Patten makes an acrobatic touchdown catch in the Patriots' upset of the Rams in Super Bowl XXXVI.
David Patten makes an acrobatic touchdown catch in the Patriots’ upset of the Rams in Super Bowl XXXVI.J.B. FORBES/Associated Press

Tunch Ilkin

Sept. 4 at age 63. All-Pro offensive tackle for the Pittsburgh Steelers and the first native of Turkey to play in the NFL.

Sam Cunningham

Sept. 7 at age 71. Powerful running back on Southern Cal’s 1972 national championship team who went on to become the career rushing leader for the Patriots.

Sam "Bam" Cunningham rushed for more than 5,400 yards in his 10-year Patriots career.
Sam “Bam” Cunningham rushed for more than 5,400 yards in his 10-year Patriots career.Phil Sandlin/Associated Press

Terry Brennan

Sept. 7 at age 93. Star halfback on undefeated Notre Dame teams that won national championships in 1946 and ‘47, and later head coach of the Fighting Irish.

Mick Tingelhoff

Sept. 11 at age 81. Hall of Fame center who started 240 consecutive games — third-most in NFL history — for the Minnesota Vikings.

Fred Stanfield

Sept. 13 at age 77. Playmaking second-line center on the Bruins’ two Stanley Cup champions in the 1970s.

Fred Stanfield centered a potent second line with John Bucyk and John McKenzie, and also played the point on the Bruins power play.
Fred Stanfield centered a potent second line with John Bucyk and John McKenzie, and also played the point on the Bruins power play.Dan Goshtigian/Globe Staff

Bill Sudakis

Sept. 15 at age 74. Infielder/catcher for the Dodgers and five other teams in the late 1960s and 1970s.

Lou Angotti

Sept. 16 at age 83. 10-year NHL forward who was the first captain of the Flyers and played in two Stanley Cup finals with the Black Hawks.

Roger Brown

Sept. 17 at age 84. College Football Hall of Famer (Maryland-Eastern Shore) and a six-time Pro Bowl defensive lineman for the Lions and Rams.

Jimmy Greaves

Sept. 19 at age 81. One of the greatest strikers in English soccer history, with 266 goals in 379 games for Tottenham and 44 in 57 games for the national team.

Cloyd Boyer

Sept. 20 at age 94. Pitcher for the Cardinals in the early 1950s and one of three brothers in his family to play in the major leagues (with Ken and Clete).

Roger Hunt

Sept. 27 at age 83. Star striker for Liverpool and a member of the only England team to win the World Cup in 1966.

Bill Killilea

Sept. 29 at age 64. Coach of various teams in the Stoneham school system for 34 years and first-year boys’ soccer coach at Matignon.

Chuck Hartenstein

Oct. 2 at age 79. Righthander whose six-year MLB career included 17 games with the Red Sox in 1970.

Budge Patty

Oct. 3 at age 97. Tennis Hall of Famer who won Wimbledon and the French Championships in 1950.

Eddie Robinson

Oct. 4 at age 100. Former general manager of the Braves and Rangers and a four-time All-Star first baseman who was the last surviving member of the 1948 World Series champion Cleveland Indians.

Mark Donovan

Oct. 10 at age 55. Shawsheen wrestling coach for 36 years who won 28 Commonwealth Athletic Conference championships and nearly 600 dual meets.

Tony DeMarco

Oct. 11 at age 89. Hall of Fame boxer from the North End who went 58-12-1 (33 knockouts) and was welterweight champion in 1955.

A statue was dedicated to Tony DeMarco (left) in the North End, his home neighborhood, in 2012.
A statue was dedicated to Tony DeMarco (left) in the North End, his home neighborhood, in 2012.Chin, Barry, Globe Staff Photo

Ray Fosse

Oct. 13 at age 74. Two-time All-Star catcher for the Indians and two-time champion with the A’s whose career would have been even better but for a punishing blow from Pete Rose in the 1970 All-Star Game.

Ray Fosse is steamrolled in the 1970 All-Star Game by Pete Rose, who barreled home with the winning run.
Ray Fosse is steamrolled in the 1970 All-Star Game by Pete Rose, who barreled home with the winning run.Associated Press

Otis Armstrong

Oct. 13 at age 70. Pro Bowl running back for the Denver Broncos.

Leo Boivin

Oct. 16 at age 90. Rugged Hall of Fame defenseman who played 12 of his 19 NHL seasons with the Bruins, serving as their captain from 1963-66.

Pat Studstill

Oct. 16 at age 83. Punter/wide receiver who led the NFL in receiving yards in 1966 and played nine years with the Lions and Rams before finishing his career with the Patriots in 1972.

Kathy Flores

Oct. 21 at age 66. Legendary figure in US women’s rugby, as player and coach.

Bob Neumeier

Oct. 23 at age 70. Popular figure in Boston sports media as a Channel 4 sportscaster, Bruins (and Whalers) radio play-by-play man, talk radio host, and horse racing aficionado.

Jim Daley

Oct. 25 at age 67. Girls’ basketball coach at Whitman-Hanson for 33 years who won 510 games and 15 league titles.

Mike Lucci

Oct. 26 at age 81. Pro Bowl linebacker for the Detroit Lions.

Bob Ferry

Oct. 27 at age 84. Two-time NBA Executive of the Year who was Washington Bullets GM when they won the NBA title in 1978 and was the father of Duke star Danny Ferry.

Jerry Remy

Oct. 30 at age 68. Scrappy Red Sox second baseman who became an immensely popular broadcaster and a local icon after his playing days.

Jerry Remy joined the NESN broadcast team in 1988 and built a huge following among the fandom known as Red Sox Nation.
Jerry Remy joined the NESN broadcast team in 1988 and built a huge following among the fandom known as Red Sox Nation.Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff/file

Tom Matte

Nov. 3 at age 82. Hard-nosed running back on the Baltimore Colts’ 1968 NFL champions and 1970 Super Bowl champions who made a memorable cameo at quarterback in 1965.

Charlie Burns

Nov. 5 at age 85. Center who played four of his 11 NHL seasons with the Bruins (1959-63).

Harvey White

Nov. 6 at age 83. First player ever signed by the Boston Patriots and their starting quarterback for two games in their inaugural 1960 season.

Pedro Feliciano

Nov. 8 at age 34. Mets reliever dubbed “Perpetual Pedro” when he was leading the major leagues in appearances for three straight years (2008-10), averaging 89 per season.

Medina Dixon

Nov. 8 at age 59. Basketball star who won a state high school championship at Cambridge Rindge and Latin, an NCAA title with Old Dominion, and a bronze medal at the 1992 Olympics.

Bob Bondurant

Nov. 12 at age 88. Champion racecar driver who opened a high-performance driving school in 1968 and taught numerous A-list actors driving skills for movie roles.

Sam Huff

Nov. 13 at age 87. Ferocious Hall of Fame linebacker who played in six NFL championship games for the Giants in the 1950s and ’60s.

Sam Huff returns an interception for the Giants in a game against Washington at Yankee Stadium in 1963.
Sam Huff returns an interception for the Giants in a game against Washington at Yankee Stadium in 1963.ERNIE SISTO/NYT

Julio Lugo

Nov. 15 at age 45. Shortstop on the Red Sox’ 2007 World Series champions.

Julio Lugo played three seasons for the Red Sox, one of his seven major league teams.
Julio Lugo played three seasons for the Red Sox, one of his seven major league teams.Bill Greene/Globe Staff

Don Kojis

Nov. 19 at age 82. An original San Diego Rocket and the NBA team’s first All-Star.

Doug Jones

Nov. 22 at age 64. All-Star reliever who saved 129 games for the Cleveland Indians and 174 more for six other teams.

Bill Virdon

Nov. 23 at age 90. Rookie of the Year for the Cardinals in 1955, center fielder on the champion Pirates in 1960, and the winningest manager in Astros franchise history.

Mark Roth

Nov. 26 at age 70. Bowling Hall of Famer who won 34 PBA titles, was Player of the Year four times, and was the first bowler to convert a 7-10 split on national television.

Curley Culp

Nov. 27 at age 75. Hall of Fame defensive lineman who helped the Chiefs win Super Bowl IV.

Lee Elder

Nov. 29 at age 87. Barrier-breaking PGA pro who in 1975 became the first Black golfer to play in the Masters and in 1979 the first on the US Ryder Cup team.

Lee Elder, who won 12 events on the PGA and Champions Tours, was an honorary starter at the 2021 Masters.
Lee Elder, who won 12 events on the PGA and Champions Tours, was an honorary starter at the 2021 Masters.Charlie Riedel/Associated Press

LaMarr Hoyt

Nov. 29 at age 66. Righthander who won the 1983 AL Cy Young Award with the White Sox, going 24-10.

Don Demeter

Nov. 29 at age 86. Outfielder who played on a World Series winner with the 1959 Dodgers and was part of a key midseason trade by the 1967 Red Sox that brought Gary Bell to Boston from Cleveland.

Chuck Dobson

Nov. 30 at age 77. Righthander who won 72 games for the Kansas City/Oakland Athletics from 1966-71.

Darlene Hard

Dec. 2 at age 85. Tennis Hall of Famer who won three major singles titles (1960 French, 1960-61 US Open) and 18 major doubles titles.

Claude Humphrey

Dec. 3 at age 77. Fearsome Hall of Fame pass rusher who played 11 seasons for the Falcons and made it to the Super Bowl with the 1980 Eagles.

Bill Glass

Dec. 5 at age 86. Pro Bowl defensive end on the Cleveland Browns’ 1964 NFL champions.

Medina Spirit

Dec. 6 at age 3. 2021 Kentucky Derby winner.

Mark Pike

Dec. 8 at age 57. Special teams standout on the Buffalo Bills’ AFC champion teams of the 1990s.

Al Unser

Dec. 9 at age 82. All-time auto racing great who counted four Indianapolis 500s among his 39 victories on the IndyCar circuit and was part of the sport’s most celebrated family.

Al Unser was congratulated by his mother after winning the 1970 Indianapolis 500.
Al Unser was congratulated by his mother after winning the 1970 Indianapolis 500.Anonymous/Associated Press

Speedy Duncan

Dec. 9 at age 79. Highlight-reel defensive back and kick returner for the AFL’s San Diego Chargers.

Demaryius Thomas

Dec. 10 at age 33. Prolific Pro Bowl receiver on two Denver Broncos Super Bowl teams, including the 2015 champions.

Demaryius Thomas (right) was briefly a member of the Patriots at the end of his career, though he did not play in a regular-season game for them.
Demaryius Thomas (right) was briefly a member of the Patriots at the end of his career, though he did not play in a regular-season game for them.Steven Senne/Associated Press

Manolo Santana

Dec. 11 at age 83. Four-time major tennis champion and the first Spaniard to win a Grand Slam singles title (French, 1961).

Roland Hemond

Dec. 12 at age 92. Three-time Executive of the Year whose career in baseball spanned 70 years.

Len Hauss

Dec. 15 at age 79. Five-time Pro Bowl center for Washington’s NFL team, including the 1972 NFC champions.

Harry Jacobs

Dec. 17 at age 84. Linebacker on the Buffalo Bills’ AFL champion teams of 1964 and ’65 who started his career with the Boston Patriots (1960-62).

John Madden

Dec. 28 at age 85. Hall of Fame coach who won Super Bowl XI with the Raiders, then became a hugely popular analyst with a bombastic style and the face of a wildly successful video game.

John Madden may be known to most as a charismatic broadcaster, but he went 103-32-7 as coach of the Raiders for 10 years.
John Madden may be known to most as a charismatic broadcaster, but he went 103-32-7 as coach of the Raiders for 10 years.MARK DUNCAN/Associated Press

Sam Jones

Dec. 30 at age 88. All-time Celtics great who played on 10 NBA championship teams and was a five-time All-Star in an illustrious 12-year career.

Sam Jones (left) drives past Jerry West in the 1968 NBA Finals against the Lakers.
Sam Jones (left) drives past Jerry West in the 1968 NBA Finals against the Lakers.HF/Associated Press

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